History of the Coins and Tokens of Canada - 1894

NORTH - WEST
 

925

The North-West Company was organized in Montreal about the year 1784. It carried on operations until about I821 in the district South and West of Hudson Bay. This coin was good for a beaver skin. It is now very rare, not over five or six specimens being known, of which four are to be found in the collections of: Mr. Thomas Wilson of Clarence, Ont., Rev. Father Michaud, C.S.V., of Montreal; Mr. W. Bastian, also of Montreal, and the last one in the Ottawa government's collection. R. 5.

 

926

Brass piece, issued about the year 1857, for use in the East Maine district, but they were soon afterwards withdrawn from circulation, as the Indians preferred to trust their balances to the Company's books rather than to these checks, which were liable to be lost. The inscription when extended means HB for Hudson's Bay; EM for East Maine, and 1 NB or MB for 1 Made Beaver or good for one made Beaver skin. The made beaver was to be unit of the currency among the Company's forts, and was usually written MB for Made Beaver, thus MF for Moose Factory and MR for Moose River, hence the reason for the mistake N for M. A made beaver might be worth more or less than the beaver skin according to rise or fall in prices. It was a value fixed by usage long ago. The East Maine district, which is really North East instead of North West, is situated East and South of Hudson's Bay, and was for a long time the most productive of the districts occupied by the Company. These coins, long considered as very rare, are now comparatively common. R. 3.

 

927

Brass. Same note as last, No: 926, except that this one is good for 1/2 beaver skin. A copy of this, the first specimen known to collectors, obtained $125.00. Now they are selling from $3 to $5.00. R. 3.

 

928

Brass. Similar to No. 926, but good for ¼. R. 3.

 

929

Brass. Similar to No. 926 good for 1/8. R. 3.

 

930

There are two mistakes in this check. The initials of Issuer should be J.H.F. instead of I.H.F., and the letters N.W.S. for North West Settlement should be N.W.T. for North West Territory. These checks were used for a time in the hotel, and the balance remaining, 75, were purchased by Mr. F. R. E. Campeau of Ottawa. R. 2.

 

931

J. H. Fleming used these checks, which have his own initials and those of the Territory correct, much more than the former ones. Consequently there were only twenty remaining when the lot was sold to Mr. Campeau of Ottawa. R. 2 ½.

 

932

Issue one hundred. Mr. John Tobin as pursued the tonsorial art for twelve ears in Winnipeg. He is now 40 years old. The check is accepted in his establishment for a shave, and it was discovered by Mr. F. E. Meloche, artist of Montreal, when he went for a shave while on a visit to that city. R. 2.

 

933

Peck's hardware house, Chicago, where Mr. Ross purchased the cutlery and silverware for his hotel, furnished him gratis with 1250 of these checks. They are not used. R. 1 ½.

 
BRITISH COLUMBIA

934

Gold twenty dollar piece. During the height of the gold fever in British Columbia, Colonel Gosilt, who was then treasurer of the Province, established a mint at New Westminster, but before any coins had been struck it was learned that no gold or silver coins could be issued except under the authority of the Queen in Council. Only one or two specimens are known. R. 6.

 

935
Gold ten dollar piece. Struck under the same circumstances as last, No. 934. R. 6.
 

936

This check was used in the above hotel in 1887. Of the 100 specimens originally struck, 63 were sold to Mr. Campeau of Ottawa. R. 2.

 

937
This check is not now used in the Central Hotel. R.2.
 

938
Issue 200. Still in use. R. 1.
 

939
Issue of 400 by Mr. Arthur Smith, of' Victoria B. C., as a business card. Mr. Smith's extensive foundry was established at Victoria in 1885; he has been a collector for over 20 years and is now 41 years old. The dies of this coin were destroyed. The obverse of this piece bears the portrait of the Hon. John Robson, Prime Minister of British Columbia. He died last year while on a trip to England, on business connected with the Province. The body was brought out for interment in Victoria. R. 1 ½.
 
DOMINION OF CANADA

940

Number of pieces in each issue. 

1870                   450,000

1871                   245,000

1872                     35,000

1881                1,500,000

1888                     60,000

1890                     20,000

1892                   151,000

Two varieties of 1871. R. 0.

 

941

Number of pieces in each issue. 

1870         900,000

1871         400,000

1872      2,400,000

1874      1,000,000

1875      1,000,000

1880         400,000

1881         820,000

1882         600,000

1883         960,000

1885         192,000

1886         400,000

1887         240,000

1888         400,000

1889           66,341

1890         200,000

1891         120,000

1892         510,000

1893         100,000

2 varieties of 1871. R. 0.

 

942

Number of pieces in each issue. 

1870      1,700,000

1871         800,000

1872      1,000,000

1874      1,000,000

1875      1,000,000

1880      1,500,000

1881         950,000

1882      1,000,000

1883      3,000,000

1884         150,000

1885         400,000

1886         650,000

1887         500,000

1888         500,000

1889         600,000

1890         450,000

1891         800,000

1892         520,000

1893         500,000

2 varieties of 1871, 1891 and 1893. R. 0.

 

943

Number of pieces in each issue.

1870      2,600,000

1871      1,400,000

1872      2,000,000

1874      1,000,000

1875      1,000,000

1880      3,000,000

1881      1,500,000

1882      1,000,000

1883         600,000

1884         200,000

1885      1,000,000

1886      1,200,000

1887      1,000,000

1888      1,000,000

1889      1,200,000

1890      1,000,000

1891      1,800,000

1892         860,000

1893      1,700,000

2 varieties of 1870 and 1874.

R. 0.

 

944

Number of pieces in each issue. 

1876      4,000,000

1881      2,000,000

1882      4,000,000

1884      2,500,000

1886      1,500,000

1887      1,500,000

1888      4,000,000

1890      1,000,000

1891      1,200,000

1892      1,200,000

1893      1,000,000

2 varieties of 1891.

R. 0.

 
NEWFOUNDLAND

945

Number of pieces in each issue. 

1865      10,000

1870      10,000

1872        6,000

1880        2,500

1881      10,000

1882      25,000

1883      10,000

1888      25,000

1890                  

R. 0. 

 

946

Number of pieces in each issue.

1870      50,000

1872      48,000

1873      32,000

1874      80,000

1876      28,000

1880      24,000

1881      50,000

1882    100,000

1885      40,000

1888      20,000

R. 0.

 

947

Number of pieces in each issue. 

1865    100,000

1870      50,000

1872      90,000

1873      40,000

1876      50,000

1880      30,000

1881      60,000

1882    100,000

1885      40,000

1888      75,000

R. 0.

 

948

Number of pieces in each issue. 

1865      80,000

1870      30,000

1872      40,000

1873      20,000

1876      10,000

1880      10,000

1882        8,000

1885      40,000

1888      30,000

R. 0.

 

949

The only specimen known of this coin was found in circulation by Mr. R. W. McLachlan. It is either a trial piece or a mule.

 

950

Number of pieces in each issue.

1865      80,000

1870      40,000

1872      40,000

1873      40,000

1876      20,000

1880      40,000

1881      40,000

1882      60,000

1885      16,000

1888      40,000

R. 0.

 

951

Number of pieces in each issue.

1865      240,000

1872      100,000

1873      200,000

1876      200,000

1880      400,000

1885        40,000

1888        50,000

R. 0.

 

952

Issued by the Messrs. Rutherford to be used as change in their business, and these coins were for many years almost the only copper change to be had on the Island. There is another variety without the date. R 1.

 

953

Issued by the same firm as was the preceding coin, No. 952, for their branch store at Harbour Grace. There are three varieties, in the first of which the horn of the sheep is opposite the letter H in Harbour, the second is as illustrated, and in the third variety the ribbon extends to the letter H in Rutherford. R. 1.

 

954

Issued by a Newfoundland merchant. It is considered very rare, and sells so high that one or two counterfeits have appeared, but the fraud was soon discovered. R. 4.

 

955

Issued in commemoration of the emendation of the fishery treaty between Great Britain and the United States. The treaty fixed the shore limits. R. 2 ½.

 

956

This coin was discovered 15 years ago in London, and found its way into the collection of Mr. Robert IV. Mc Lachlan. It was considered unique until a second specimen was discovered last year by the Rev. Father Michaud of Montreal. These are the only two specimens known up to the present time. The fact that McAuslane's store was destroyed by fire explains its rarity. Peter McAuslane still does business, but has removed to a town in the Province of Ontario. R. 5.

 
ANONYMOUS AND MISCELLANEOUS

957

Struck for circulation in England, and exported to Canada when the new copper coinage of George IV was issued. 2 varieties. R. 2.

 

958

1812-13. R. 1 ½.

 

959

1812-13. 2 varieties of each date. R. 1 ½.

 

960

Two varieties in copper, full weight, were imported from Birmingham by the firm of Joseph Tiffin & Co. So well received were they that great quantities of light brass imitations were struck in Canada. These are very rudely done. About 20 varieties. R. 0.

 

961

Six varieties in brass, very rude in workmanship. R. 1.

 

962

1812-13-14. 2 varieties of 1813. R. 1 ½.

 

963

 R. 1.

 

964

This coin is said to have been imported into Halifax by a dealer in fancy goods, named Haliburton. He afterwards failed and removed to the United States. R. 1 ½.

 

965

R. 1.

 

966

R. 1.

 

967

R. 1.

 

968

R. 3.

 

969

R. 1.

 

970

R. 3.

 

971

R. 1.

 

972

 2 varieties. R. 1.

 

973

R. 3 ½.

 

974

R. 3 ½.

 

975

R. 2 ½.

 

976

 2 varieties. R. 1 ½.

 

977

R. 3 ½.

 

978

R. 2.

 

979

 3 varieties. R. 1.

 

980

 2 varieties. R. 2.

 

981

3 varieties. R. 1 ½.

 

982

R. 1.

 

983

R. 2.

 

984

R. 2 ½.

 

985

R. 2 ½.

 

986

Several varieties; one, which is much rarer than the others, has the "U" and "I" in Cuidad transposed, making it read Ciudad. R. 1. Variety with Ciudad. R. 2.

 

987

Several varieties in copper and brass. R. 1.

 

988

1 ½.

 

989

2 ½.

 

990

  2 varieties. R. 1 ½.

 

991

R. 3.

 

992

R. 1.

 

993

This is claimed by Christmas for Jamaica, but since Sandham described it among his doubtful, it has been classed as Canadian. Atkin believes it to be an English token. R. 1 ½.

 

994

1813-14-15. 2 varieties of each date. R. 1.

 

995

This coin was probably issued in Prince Edward Island, where a large hoard was discovered. R. 1 ½.

 

996

This coin, which was also found in large numbers in the Prince Edward Island hoard, seems to have been issued about the same time as last. The side bearing the ship is from the same die. R. 1 ½.

 

997

About 25 varieties. R. 0.

 

998

R. 3.

 

999

R. 4.

 

1000

R. 4 ½.

 

1001

R. 3 ½.

 

1002

3 varieties. R. 2.

 

1003

R. 1 ½.

 

1004

R. 1 ½.

 

1005

R. 2 ½.

 

1006

R. 2.

 

1007

R. 1 ½.

 

1008

A very rude and poorly struck coin. It is also rare, not more than three or four specimens being known. R. 4.

 

1009

This is claimed by Lindsay, with some show of reason as Irish, and by Dr. Dickinson, without any reason, as American. Sandham's claims seem to have made a home for it among Canadians. R. 1 ½.

 

1010

Two varieties imported from Birmingham by a Toronto firm. R. 1 ½.

 

1011

2 varieties. R. 1.

 

1012

1820-25. There are about twenty-five varieties, mostly common, besides one dated 1825, which is very rare. They are all very inferior in workmanship. 1820 - R. 0., 1825 - R. 4.

 

1013

This piece is claimed by one American Numismatist as pertaining to the United States. It was up to recent times found plentifully in circulation, in fair condition. This would indicate a much more recent date of issue than that on the coin. R. 1.

 

Contents & Directory

All images are illustrated approximately 1.5 X.

Preface

Includes - Table of rarities, Wampum & Card Money.

French Regime

Breton 501 to 519.

Quebec-1

Breton 520 to 533.

Quebec-2

L'Isle and Repentigny tokens.
Breton 534 to 557.

Quebec-3

Breton 558 to 669.

Quebec-4

The Bouquet Series.
Breton 670 to 716.

Ontario

Breton 717 to 856.

Colonies in general

Province of Canada, Nova Scotia,

New Brunswick & Prince Edward Island.

Breton 857 to 924.

North-West

British Columbia, Dominion of Canada, 
Newfoundland, Anonymous and Miscellaneous
Breton 925 to 924.

Biographies

Of the Principal Canadian Collectors.

Paper money

 

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