CANADIAN ERROR COINS - WRONG PLANCHET STRIKES

Canadian Wrong Planchet Strikes

A coin that is unintentionally struck on a planchet that is designed for a different purpose.

 

Wrong Planchet Strikes found in circulation on the new Multi-Ply Plated
Steel planchets produced by the Royal Canadian Mint for foreign countries.

Canada 25 Cents - 2011
Struck on a planchet intended
for a Philippine 1 Piso

Philippine 1 Piso - 2011
Struck by the Royal Canadian Mint

Comparison of Thickness


The image above is a comparison of the 25 cents struck on the Philippine 1 Piso planchet that is 1.86 mm thick, on top, with a regular 25 cents with the thickness of 1.52 mm. on the bottom.

Composition - Nickel Plated Steel
Weight - 5.40 gm - Diameter - 23.85 mm
Thickness - 1.86 mm -
*Estimated value $300.00

Composition: Nickel Plated Steel
Weight: 5.40 gm - Diameter: 23.95 mm
Thickness: 1.81 mm

More information on 
foreign coins struck by RCM

The thickness of reeding incused on a collar is typically 2 - 3 times the intended thickness imparted on the edge of the coin.

Canada 10 Cents - 2007
Struck on a planchet intended
for a Ghana 5 Pesewas

Ghana 5 Pesewas - 2007
Struck by the Royal Canadian Mint

Comparison of Thickness

Composition: Nickel Plated Steel
Weight: 2.54 gm - Diameter: 18.02 mm 
Thickness: 1.64 mm

Composition: Nickel Plated Steel
Weight: 2.52 gm -  Diameter: 17.98 mm 
Thickness: 1.51 mm

The image above is a comparison of the 10 cents struck on the Ghana 5 Pesewas planchet that is 1.64 mm thick, on top, with a regular 10 cents with the thickness of 1.24 mm. on the bottom.

*Estimated value $250.00

More information on foreign coins struck by RCM


A brochure on the RCM plating process


An article to help understand electromagnetic signatures in coins


2006 One Dollar
Struck on a Planchet Intended for a Twenty Five Cent Coin 

 

4.6 Grams - Nickel Plated Steel 
This coin was found in change received at a
fund raiser in Fredericton, New Brunswick.
*Estimated value $900.00

More information regarding Wrong Planchet Strikes

 


Two Dollar Wrong Planchet Strikes

 

1996 Two Dollars struck on a
Planchet Intended for a Canada One Dollar Coin 

Two Dollars struck on a Planchet
intended for a One Dollar Coin

7 Grams - Aureate Bronze Plated Nickel *Estimated value $900.00*

About 15 reported.


1996 Two Dollars struck on a
Planchet intended for a Bangladesh Five Takka
1996 Bangladesh 5 Takka coin. (km 18.2)

Stainless Steel - 7.95 Grams
More information on coins struck for Bangladesh by Canada

This coin is struck on a planchet intended for a
12 Sided Bangladesh 5 Takka coin. (km 18.2)

7.95 Grams - Stainless Steel. *Estimated value $2,000.00*

Canada has struck coins for Bangladesh since 1977. 

It appears that for large multi-shaped coins, the planchets are pre-formed to facilitate striking.

The image of the reverse (left) shows a light rim while the obverse (right) rim is thicker and is dark due - to being struck on a type I Planchet. When a planchet is punched from strip it has a sharp side associated with the top end of the punch when it went through the strip. While a slightly curved edge opposes and is associated with the bottom of the strip when the planchet is cut. The effect here on this photo is that the side that has the slightly curved edge is appearing dark as the light reflects differently than the rest of the flat coin. In the case of this multisided coin, the planchet was punched from strip with 12 sides and due to its shape, cannot be upset prior to strike as round planchets.  
The dark edge on the coin on the left is a lighting effect due to being struck on a Type I planchet.
These coins were all struck on planchets that were not upset. (marked, rimmed)


1999 Two Dollars struck on a
Planchet intended for a Ghana 200 Cedis

This Nunavut coin is struck on a planchet intended for a
Ghana 200 Cedis coin. (km 35)

8.45 Grams - Nickel Plated Steel.  *Estimated value $1,500.00*

Canada has struck coins for Ghana since 1995. 

The seven arrows around the reverse image on the left indicate the "points" on this seven sided planchet.

More information on coins struck for Ghana by Canada

Images not to scale.


1988 Two Dollars struck on a
Planchet intended for a United Arab Emirates One Durham


This coin is struck on a planchet intended for a
United Arab Emirates One Durham Coin. (km 6.2)

This coin was found in Bathurst, New Brunswick at Dominos Pizza.

6.35 Grams - Copper Nickel. *Estimated value $1,000.00*

Canada has struck coins for U.A.E. since 1988. 

More information on coins struck for UAE by Canada  

Images not to scale.



1996 Wrong Planchet Strike - Not!

This Two dollar coin is struck on a planchet that is completely Nickel. It appears to be struck on a proper planchet that did not have the centre hole punched out. So called "All Nickel Twoonie".

This coin is made of nickel and weighs 7.65 grams.
This does not match with known foreign planchets produced by the RCM, or any known coin worldwide.
*Estimated value $1,500.00*

This coin is actually a planchet error and will be moved in revision.


1999 One Cent
Struck on a Core intended for a Two Dollar coin

This coin is the result of a Two Dollar core being mix in with regular Cent planchets and then being fed to the Dies and struck as a One Cent coin.
The Cent appears to be brass or maybe even plated, however, this error can be positively identified, as the specific gravity of the alloy used to make cores is quite distinctive, due to its slight aluminum content.

*Estimated value $450.00*


2000 "Wisdom" Quarter
Struck on a Core intended for a Two Dollar coin

Nice example of a Quarter struck on a
Core intended for a Two Dollar coin.

*Estimated value $750.00*

Please send any information regarding Two Dollar Error coins to Patrick

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Changes last made on: 08/06/16


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